MARTHA GRAY























Mark LOREM IPSUM



CVH (Cyanotype, Vinegar, Honey) is the first in an ongoing series of works using a combination of chemical processes and foodstuffs.
21.0 x 29.7 cm
2016

Mark



CVHG (Cyanotype, Vinegar, Honey, Glitch) Climate Change explores the ecology of climate change in correlation to the bodys ecosystem, through the glitching of the image file with field recordings.   
150 x 212.03 cm
2017

Mark



CVHG Bubble (Cyanotype, Vinegar, Honey, Glitch) combines analogue chemical processes with modern technologies, through the glitching the image file with the use of sound editing software.

21.0 x 29.7 cm
2017

Mark



CVH (Cyanotype, Vinegar, Honey) Toxicity is the progression and final work in an ongoing exploration of the tenuous relationship between mind and body. Exploring the narrative of the toxicity within the body, the toxic impact these emotions can have on the mind and the correlation of these subjects to the toxic potential of the chemicals mixed within my process.
152.38 x 107.79 cm
2018



Mark

My practice is grounded in the relationship between art and science, particularly photography and chemistry, as historically these intersections have always intertwined. My current ongoing series of works, CVH (Cyanotype, Vinegar, Honey) aims to explore the correlation of toxicity within the fragility of mind and body by merging new and old technologies, analogue and digital. The timeline of this project started with the disruption by an un-diagnosable illness to my body, causing me to embark on a journey of experimental treatments, both physical and psychological and the resultant emotional strain and its effect on the physical aspects of the illness.

The chemical reactions I instigate represent the other worldly environment that is within our human bodies. The process entails the mixture of cyanotype, honey and vinegar, being foodstuffs that effect my condition. Each element has its own specific role to play. The cyanotype works as the photographic base for these interactions, metaphorically connected to my body, enabling these chemical reactions to happen while being corroded and forced to alter from its designed outcome.  The acid in the vinegar mixed with the potassium ferricyanide in the cyanotype has the potential to create the reaction of cyanide gas, creating a very literal element of toxicity, while also corrupting and bleaching the cyanotype. Honey slowly consumes and dissolves the cyanotype within it, stopping the process’s original function from working. Within the images I make, the body is represented by the surface of the paper, the internal imbalances by the various substances colliding. The micro chemical reactions are enlarged as macro images, becoming almost overwhelming with every detail magnified, exposing the dramatic sensations they create.

The uncertainty of the outcome of the process correlates with the uncertainty within daily life. The decision to shoot digitally at a micro scale examines how internal factors whether they be mental or physical can define the larger image of an individual’s life. The medium of micro photography is also in homage to the works of early scientific photography, referencing the micro topography works of Carl Struwe and other such advancements by the linking of cameras to microscopes in the 1800’s. The use of cyanotype follows along this narrative, being an early analogue photographic chemical process favoured by botanical artist and scientist Anna Atkins.

Exploring these themes, the relationships between mind, body and chemistry in combination with process driven work define my practice, from the placement of the foodstuffs to the capturing of the chemical reactions, post exposure and pre washing of the cyanotype. The process is driven by myself but the outcome cannot be fully controlled or dictated. The abstract image created by the fraction of a second recorded by the camera captures a single moment in a continuously developing flow of interactions.  This is the moment when the process becomes the artwork.